E-Print Archive

There are 3836 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
JHelioviewer - Time-dependent 3D visualisation of solar and heliospheric data  

Daniel Mueller   Submitted: 2017-05-23 11:22

Context. Solar observatories are providing the world-wide community with a wealth of data, covering large time ranges (e.g. SOHO), multiple viewpoints (STEREO), and returning large amounts of data (SDO). In particular, the large volume of SDO data presents challenges: it is available only from a few repositories, and full-disk, full-cadence data for reasonable durations of scientific interest are difficult to download practically due to their size and download data rates available to most users. From a scientist's perspective this poses three problems: accessing, browsing and finding interesting data as efficiently as possible. Aims. To address these challenges, we have developed JHelioviewer, a visualisation tool for solar data based on the JPEG2000 compression standard and part of the open source ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Since the first release of JHelioviewer, the scientific functionality of the software has been extended significantly, and the objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements. Methods. The JPEG2000 standard offers useful new features that facilitate the dissemination and analysis of high-resolution image data and offers a solution to the challenge of efficiently browsing petabyte-scale image archives. The JHelioviewer software is open source, platform independent and extendable via a plug-in architecture. Results. With JHelioviewer, users can visualise the Sun for any time period between September 1991 and today. They can perform basic image processing in real time, track features on the Sun and interactively overlay magnetic field extrapolations. The software integrates solar event data and a time line display. Once an interesting event has been identified, science quality data can be accessed for in-depth analysis. As a first step towards supporting science planning of the upcoming Solar Orbiter mission, JHelioviewer offers a virtual camera model that enables users to set the vantage point to the location of a spacecraft or celestial body at any given time.

Authors: D. Mueller, B. Nicula, S. Felix, F. Verstringe, B. Bourgoignie, A. Csillaghy, D. Berghmans, P. Jiggens, J. P. Garcia-Ortiz, J. Ireland, S. Zahniy, B. Fleck
Projects: None

Publication Status: accepted for publication in A&A
Last Modified: 2017-05-24 14:22
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Solar Orbiter: Exploring the Sun-heliosphere connection  

Daniel Mueller   Submitted: 2012-07-18 08:15

The heliosphere represents a uniquely accessible domain of space, where fundamental physical processes common to solar, astrophysical and laboratory plasmas can be studied under conditions impossible to reproduce on Earth and unfeasible to observe from astronomical distances. Solar Orbiter, the first mission of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, will address the central question of heliophysics: How does the Sun create and control the heliosphere? In this paper, we present the scientific goals of the mission and provide an overview of the mission implementation.

Authors: D. Mueller, R.G. Marsden, O.C. StCyr, H.R. Gilbert for the Solar Orbiter Team
Projects:

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Solar Physics
Last Modified: 2012-07-20 11:37
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

JHelioviewer - Visualizing large sets of solar images using JPEG 2000  

Daniel Mueller   Submitted: 2009-06-08 13:43

Across all disciplines that work with image data - from astrophysics to medical research and historic preservation - there is a growing need for efficient ways to browse and inspect large sets of high-resolution images. We present the development of a visualization software for solar physics data based on the JPEG 2000 image compression standard. Our implementation consists of the JHelioviewer client application that enables users to browse petabyte-scale image archives and the JHelioviewer server, which integrates a JPIP server, metadata catalog and an event server. JPEG 2000 offers many useful new features and has the potential to revolutionize the way high-resolution image data are disseminated and analyzed. This is especially relevant for solar physics, a research field in which upcoming space missions will provide more than a terabyte of image data per day. Providing efficient access to such large data volumes at both high spatial and high time resolution is of paramount importance to support scientific discovery.

Authors: Daniel Mueller, George Dimitoglou, Benjamin Caplins, Juan Pablo Garcia Ortiz, Benjamin Wamsler, Keith Hughitt, Alen Alexanderian, Jack Ireland, Desmond Amadigwe, Bernhard Fleck
Projects: SoHO-EIT,SoHO-MDI,SoHO-LASCO

Publication Status: accepted for publication in Computing in Science & Engineering
Last Modified: 2009-06-09 02:30
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Daniel Mueller   Submitted: 2008-04-21 10:28

Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fan. We argue that the time-dependent evolution of this scenario will be very dynamic since the change from a bald patch to null point topology cannot occur via a simple ideal evolution in the corona. We discuss the implications of these findings for recent Hinode XRT observations of coronal hole jets and give an outline of planned time-dependent 3D MHD simulations to fully assess this scenario.

Authors: D.A.N. Müller and S.K. Antiochos
Projects: None

Publication Status: in press
Last Modified: 2008-09-23 21:09
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Daniel Mueller   Submitted: 2008-04-21 10:27

Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fan. We argue that the time-dependent evolution of this scenario will be very dynamic since the change from a bald patch to null point topology cannot occur via a simple ideal evolution in the corona. We discuss the implications of these findings for recent Hinode XRT observations of coronal hole jets and give an outline of planned time-dependent 3D MHD simulations to fully assess this scenario.

Authors: D.A.N. Mueller and S.K. Antiochos
Projects: None

Publication Status: in press
Last Modified: 2008-09-23 21:10
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
JHelioviewer - Time-dependent 3D visualisation of solar and heliospheric data
Solar Orbiter: Exploring the Sun-heliosphere connection
JHelioviewer - Visualizing large sets of solar images using JPEG 2000
Subject will be restored when possible
Subject will be restored when possible

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University