E-Print Archive

There are 3897 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Observations of Plasma Upflow in a Warm Loop with Hinode/EIS  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2012-06-17 08:15

A complete understanding of Doppler shift in active region loops canhelp probe the basic physical mechanism involved into the heating ofthose loops. Here we present observations of upflows in coronal loopsdetected in a range of temperature temperatures (log, T=5.8 - 6.2).The loop was not discernible above these temperatures. The speed ofupflow was strongest at the footpoint and decreased with height. Theupflow speed at the footpoint was about 20 km s-1 inFeVIII which decreased with temperature being about13 km s-1 in FeX, about 8 kms-1 in FeXII and about 4 kms-1 in FeXIII. To the best of ourknowledge this is the first observation providing evidence of upflowof plasma in coronal loop structures at these temperatures. Weinterpret these observations as evidence of chromospheric evaporationin quasi-static coronal loops.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi, Helen E. Mason, Giulio Del Zanna, and Steve Bradshaw
Projects: Hinode/EIS

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters
Last Modified: 2012-06-17 12:31
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Active Region Moss: Doppler Shifts from Hinode/EIS Observations  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2012-05-02 00:02

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode on 12-Dec-2007 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low density cut-off as derived by Tripathi et al. (2010). We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described in Young et al. (2012). For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s-1 with an estimated error of 4-5 km s-1. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blue shift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries towards blue-shift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s-1 is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi, Helen E. Mason, James A. Klimchuk
Projects: Hinode/EIS

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Last Modified: 2012-05-02 11:15
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2011-07-28 04:37

Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode,we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions.Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emissionmeasure distributions having an approximate power-law form EMpropto T2.4from log,T = 5.5 up to a peak at log,T = 6.55. We show that theobservations compare very favorably with a simple model of nanoflare-heatedloop strands. They also appear to be consistent with more sophisticatednanoflare models. However, in the absence of additional constraints, steadyheating is also a viable explanation.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi, James A. Klimchuk, Helen E. Mason
Projects: Hinode/EIS

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Last Modified: 2011-07-29 07:56
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Evidence of Impulsive Heating in Active Region Core Loops  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2010-09-03 10:07

Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained Emission Measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely static equilibrium, strong condensation and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. (2008). The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strik- ingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T [K] = 5.15?6.3. Using photospheric abundances we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EMcon), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and pos- sibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The down- flows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3?5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi, Helen E. Mason, James A. Klimchuk
Projects: Hinode/EIS

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in ApJ
Last Modified: 2010-09-03 20:23
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Active Region Moss: Basic Physical Parameters and Their Temporal Variation  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2010-05-18 03:04

Context. Active region moss are transition region phenomena, first noted in the images recorded by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in λ171. Moss regions are thought to be the footpoints of hot loops (3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions. These hot loops appear "fuzzy" (unresolved). Therefore, it is difficult to study the physical plasma parameters in individual hot core loops and hence their heating mechanisms. Moss regions provide an excellent opportunity to study the physics of hot loops. In addition, they allow us to study the transition region dynamics in the footpoint regions. Aims. To derive the physical plasma parameters such as temperature, electron density, and filling factors in moss regions and to study their variation over a short (an hour) and a long time period (5 consecutive days). Methods. Primarily, we have analyzed spectroscopic observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode. In addition we have used supplementary observations taken from TRACE and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. Results. The moss emission is strongest in the Fe xii and Fe xiii lines. Based on analyses using line ratios and emission measure we found that moss regions have a characteristic temperature of log T[K] = 6.2. The temperature structure in moss region remains almost identical from one region to another and it does not change with time. The electron densities measured at different locations in the moss regions using Fe xii ratios are about 1-3 ? 1010 cm-3 and about 2-4 ? 109 cm-3 using Fe xiii and Fe xiv. The densities in the moss regions are similar in different places and show very little variation over short and long time scales. The derived electron density substantially increased (by a factor of about 3-4 or even more in some cases) when a background subtraction was performed. The filling factor of the moss plasma can vary between 0.1-1 and the path length along which the emission originates is from a few 100 to a few 1000 kms long. By combining the observations recorded by TRACE, EIS and XRT, we find that the moss regions correspond to the footpoints of both hot and warm loops.

Authors: D. Tripathi, H. E. Mason, G. Del Zanna, P. R. Young
Projects: Hinode/EIS

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Last Modified: 2010-05-18 11:52
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2009-10-21 08:13

Since the first reports of oscillations in prominences in 1930s there have been major theoretical and observational advances to understand the nature of these oscillatory phenomena leading to a whole new field of so called ''prominence seismology''. There are two types of oscillatory phenomena observed in prominences; ''small amplitude oscillations'' (2-3 km s-1) which are quite common and ''large amplitude oscillations'' (>20 km s-1) for which observations are scarce. Large amplitude oscillations have been found as ''winking filament'' in Hα as well as motion in the sky plane in Hα , EUV, micro-wave and He 10830 observations. Historically, it was suggested that the large amplitude oscillations in prominences were triggered by disturbances such as fast-mode MHD waves (Moreton wave) produced by remote flares. Recent observations show, in addition, that near-by flares or jets can also create such large amplitude oscillations in prominences. Large amplitude oscillations, which are observed both in transverse as well as longitudinal direction, have a range of periods varying from tens of minutes to a couple of hours. Using the observed period of oscillation and simple theoretical models, the obtained magnetic field in prominences has shown quite a good agreement with directly measured one and therefore, justifies prominences seismology as a powerful diagnostic tool. On rare occasions, when the large amplitude oscillations have been observed before or during the eruption, the oscillations may be applied to diagnose the stability and the eruption mechanism. Here we review the recent developments and understanding in the observational properties of large amplitude oscillations and their trigger mechanisms and stability in the context of prominence seismology.

Authors: D. Tripathi, H. Isobe, R. Jain
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews
Last Modified: 2009-10-21 09:59
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Temperature Tomography of a Coronal Sigmoid Supporting the Gradual Formation of a Flux Rope  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2009-04-30 04:54

Multi-wavelength observations of a sigmoidal (S-shaped) solar coronal source by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-ray Telescope aboard the Hinode spacecraft and by the EUV Imager aboard STEREO are reported. The data reveal the coexistence of a pair of J-shaped hot arcs at temperatures T>2 MK with an S-shaped structure at somewhat lower temperatures T~1.3 MK. The middle section of the S-shaped structure runs along the polarity inversion line of the photospheric field, bridging the gap between the arcs. Flux cancellation occurs at the same location in the photosphere. The sigmoid forms in the gradual decay phase of the active region, which does not experience an eruption. These findings correspond to the expected signatures of a flux rope forming, or being augmented, gradually by a topology transformation inside a magnetic arcade. In such a transformation, the plasma on newly formed helical field lines in the outer flux shell of the rope (S-shaped in projection) is expected to enter a cooling phase once the reconnection of their parent field line pairs (double-J shaped in projection) is complete. Thus, the data support the conjecture that flux ropes can exist in the corona prior to eruptive activity.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi, Bernhard Kliem, Helen Mason, Peter Young, Lucie Green
Projects: Hinode/EIS,Hinode/XRT,SoHO-MDI,STEREO

Publication Status: Accepted for Publication in ApJ Letters
Last Modified: 2009-04-30 08:41
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Partially-erupting prominences: a comparison between observations and model-predicted observables  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2009-02-26 04:37

AIMS: We investigate several partially-erupting prominences to study their relationship with other CME-associated phenomena and compare these observations with observables predicted by a model of partially-expelled-flux-ropes (Gibson & Fan, 2006a, b). METHODS: We studied 6 selected events with partially-erupting prominences using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), and soft X-ray telescope (SXT). The observational features associated with partially-erupting prominences were then compared with the predicted observables from the model. RESULTS: The partially-expelled-flux-rope (PEFR) model can explain the partial eruption of these prominences, and in addition predicts a variety of other CME-related observables that provide evidence of internal reconnection during eruption. We find that all of the partially-erupting prominences studied in this paper exhibit indirect evidence of internal reconnection. Moreover, all cases showed evidence of at least one observable unique to the PEFR model, e.g., dimmings external to the source region and/or a soft X-ray cusp overlying a reformed sigmoid. CONCLUSIONS: The PEFR model provides a plausible mechanism to explain the observed evolution of partially-erupting-prominence-associated CMEs in our study.

Authors: D. Tripathi, S. E. Gibson, J. Qiu, L. Fletcher, R.Liu, H. Gilbert, H. E. Mason
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted for Publication in A&A
Last Modified: 2009-02-26 07:35
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

On active region loops: Hinode/EIS observations  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2008-12-31 06:15

We have carried out a study of active region loops using observations from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode using 1~arcsec~raster data for an active region observed on May 19, 2007. We find that active region structures which are clearly discernible in cooler lines (approx~1MK) become 'fuzzy' at higher temperatures (approx~2MK). The active region was comprised of red-shifted emissions (downflows) in the core and blue-shifted emissions (upflows) at the boundary. The flow velocities estimated in two regions located near the foot points of coronal loop showed red-shifted emission at transition region temperature and blue shifted emission at coronal temperature. The upflow speed in these regions increased with temperature. For more detailed study we selected one particular well defined loop. Downward flows are detected along the coronal loop, being stronger in lower temperature lines (rising up to 60 km s-1 near the foot point). The downflow was localized towards the footpoint in transition region lines (ion{Mg}{7}) and towards the loop top in high temperature line (ion{Fe}{15}). By carefully accounting for the background emission we found that the loop structure was close to isothermal for each position along the loop, with the temperature rising from around 0.8 MK to 1.5 MK from the close to the base to higher up towards the apex (approx~75Mm). We derived electron density using well established line ratio diagnostic techniques. Electron densities along the active region loop were found to vary from 10~10cm-3 close to the footpoint to 10~8.5cm-3 higher up. A lower electron density, varying from 10~9cm-3 close to the footpoint to 10~8.5cm-3 higher up, was found for the lower temperature density diagnostic. Using these densities we derived filling factors in along the coronal loop which can be as low as 0.02 near the base of the loop. The filling factor increased with projected height of the loop. These results provide important constraints on coronal loop modeling.

Authors: D. Tripathi, H.E.Mason, B. N. Dwivedi, G. Del Zanna, P.R. Young
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted for Publication in ApJ
Last Modified: 2008-12-31 07:13
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2007-10-03 04:30

The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides an excellent opportunity to study the physical plasma parameters in spatially resolved coronal features. In this paper we present the density structure in an active region at many different temperatures. The active region was rastered on May 01, 2007 with the 2 arcsec slit. We find that the electron density is highest in the core of the active region where it exceeds Log (Ne)=10.5.

Authors: D. Tripathi, H. E. Mason, P. R. Young, C. Chifor, G. Del Zanna
Projects: Hinode

Publication Status: Submitted for publication
Last Modified: 2007-10-03 07:45
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

On the relationship between coronal waves associated with a CME on 5 March 2000  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2007-08-14 03:57

Aim: To study the relationship between coronal mass ejection (CME) associated waves. Methods: Analysis of CME eruption observations on 5 Mar. 2000 recorded by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS), and the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Results: Images recorded by the LASCO/C2 show a clear deflection and kink in a streamer located eastward of the CME. The kink in the streamer propagated outwards along with the associated CME. No CME material was seen between the bright front of the CME and the streamer. UVCS spectra show large spectral line broadening, Doppler shifts and intensity changes in the ion{O}{vi} (lambda1032 & 1037) lines. Moreover, intensity enhancements in lines such as ion{Si}{xii}~lambda~520 and ion{Mg}{x}~lambda~625 forming at very high temperatures (>2 MK; not often observed in the corona) were also observed. EIT images show the propagation of a wave from the CME source region. The speed of the wave was about 55 km s-1 and it propagated predominantly in the North-East direction from the source region. Furthermore, it does not propagate through active regions and coronal holes. The deflection in the streamer recorded in the LASCO/C2 was in the same direction as that of the EIT wave. Conclusions: Spatial and temporal correlations show that the deflection and the propagation of the kink in the streamer (based on the LASCO data), and plasma heating and spectral line broadening (based on the UVCS data), are basically due to a CME-driven shock wave. The spatial and temporal correlations between the EIT wave and the shock wave provide strong evidence in favor of the interpretation that the EIT waves are indeed the counterpart of CME-driven shock waves in the lower corona. Although, we cannot rule out the possibility that the EIT waves are just a manifestation of the stretching of the field lines due to the outward propagation of the CMEs.

Authors: D. Tripathi and N.-E.Raouafi
Projects: SoHO-EIT,SoHO-LASCO,SoHO-SUMER

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Last Modified: 2007-08-14 07:35
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

A bright coronal downflow seen in multi-wavelength observations: evidence of a bifurcating flux-rope?  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2007-07-03 05:23

Aim: To study the origin and characteristics of a bright coronal downflow seen after a coronal mass ejection associated with erupting prominences on 5~March 2000. Methods: This study extends that of Tripathi et al. (2006) based on the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) and the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) observations. We combined those results with an analysis of the observations taken by the H α and the Mk4 coronagraphs at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). The combined data-set spans a broad range of temperature as well as continuous observations from the solar surface out to 30 Rsun. Results: The downflow started at around 1.6Rsun and contained both hot and cold gas. The downflow was observed in the H α and the Mk4 coronagraphs as well as the EIT and the SXT and was approximately co-spatial and co-temporal providing evidence of multi-thermal plasma. The H α and Mk4 images show cusp-shaped structures close to the location where the downflow started. Mk4 observations reveal that the speed of the downflow in the early phase was substantially higher than the free-fall speed, implying a strong downward acceleration near the height at which the downflow started. Conclusions: The origin of the downflow was likely to have been magnetic reconnection taking place inside the erupting flux rope that led to its bifurcation.

Authors: D. Tripathi, S.K. Solanki, H.E. Mason, D.F. Webb
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Last Modified: 2007-07-03 09:43
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

EIT and TRACE responses to flare plasma  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2006-11-06 09:38

Aims: To understand the contribution of active region and flare plasmas to the 195 A channels of SOHO/EIT (Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) and TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer). Methods: We have analysed an M8 flare simultaneously observed by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), EIT, TRACE and RHESSI. We obtained synthetic spectra for the flaring region and an outer region using the differential emission measures (DEM) of emitting plasma based on CDS and RHESSI observations and the CHIANTI atomic database. We then predicted the EIT and TRACE count rates. Results: For the flaring region, both EIT and TRACE images taken through the 195 A filter are dominated by Fe XXIV (formed at about 20 MK). However, in the outer region, the emission was primarily due to the Fe XII, with substantial contributions from other lines. The average count rate for the outer region was within 25% the observed value for EIT, while for TRACE it was a factor of two higher. For the flare region, the predicted count rate was a factor of two (in case of EIT) and a factor of three (in case of TRACE) higher than the actual count rate. Conclusions: During a solar flare, both TRACE and EIT 195 A channels are found to be dominated by Fe XXIV emission. Reasonable agreement between predictions and observations is found, however some discrepancies need to be further investigated.

Authors: D. Tripathi, G. Del Zanna, H. E. Mason, C. Chifor
Projects: SoHO-EIT,SoHO-CDS,TRACE

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in A&A letters
Last Modified: 2006-11-06 09:46
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

On the propagation of brightening after filament/prominence eruptions, as seen by SoHO-EIT  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2006-04-04 13:37

We studied the relationship between the propagation of brightening and erupting filaments/prominences in order to get some insight into the three-dimensional picture of magnetic reconnection based on observations taken by SoHO/EIT. We found that when the prominences/filaments erupted having one point fixed - asymmetric eruption - the brightening propagated along the neutral line together with the expansion/separation from the polarity inversion line (PIL) as expected from the standard models. However in case of symmetric eruptions, the brightening propagated towards both end points starting at the middle. When the prominence/filament erupted faster then the speed of the propagating brightening was faster and vice-versa. Based on these observations we conclude that the eruption and magnetic reconnection - propagation (along the PIL) and separation (away from PIL) of the brightening - are dynamically coupled phenomena. These observations can be explained by a simple extension of the 2D models illustrating eruption and magnetic reconnection to a 3D model.

Authors: D. Tripathi, H. Isobe, H. E. Mason
Projects: SoHO-EIT

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in Astronoy and Astrophysics
Last Modified: 2006-04-10 15:51
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

EUV and Coronagraphic Observations of Coronal Mass Ejetions  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2005-12-29 05:46

To identify the exact source regions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and to understand the basic physical mechanisms involved in their initiation are amongst the major challenges of modern day solar physics. The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) provides unique observations to study CMEs from 1.1 to 30 solar radii since its launch in December 1995. This thesis describes the basic physical properties of EUV post-eruptive arcades (PEAs) observed by EIT at 195 A and their role as tracers of source regions of CMEs. A detailed study of specific EUV PEA event led to the discovery of coronal downflow above the PEA emphasizing the importance of post-CME reconnection. For specific PEA events magnetograms taken from Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard SoHO are analyzed to study the basic mechanisms involved in CME initiation. Different varieties of evolutions in the photospheric magnetic field were detected during the time of CME eruptions. We expect that the upcoming missions like Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory (STEREO) and SOLAR-B will work in conjunction, helping us to better understand the coupling between the photosphere and the corona.

Authors: Durgesh Tripathi
Projects: Soho-EIT,Soho-MDI,Soho-LASCO

Publication Status: Published-2005
Last Modified: 2005-12-29 05:46
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Observation of a bright coronal downflow by SOHO/EIT  

Durgesh Tripathi   Submitted: 2005-12-06 12:13

A distinct coronal downflow has been discovered in the course of a prominence eruption associated coronal mass ejection (CME) imaged by EIT (Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) and LASCO (Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph) on board SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) on 05-Mar-2000. Evolution of the prominences seen by EIT was tracked into the LASCO/C2 and C3 field-of-view where they developed as the core of a typical three-part CME. In contrast to the inflow structures reported earlier in the literatures, which were dark and were interpreted as plasma voids moving down, the downflow reported here was bright. The downflow, which was only seen in EIT FOV had onset time that coincided with the deceleration phase of the core of the CME. The downflow showed a rapid acceleration followed by a strong deceleration. The downflow followed a curved path which may be explained by material following the apex of a contracting magnetic loop sliding down along other field lines, although other explanations are also possible. Irrespective of the detailed geometry, this observation provides support for the pinching off of the field lines drawn-out by the erupting prominences and the contraction of the arcade formed by the reconnection.

Authors: D. Tripathi, S. K. Solanki, R. Schwenn, V. Bothmer, M. Mierla, G. Stenborg
Projects: Soho-EIT

Publication Status: Accepted
Last Modified: 2005-12-06 12:13
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Observations of Plasma Upflow in a Warm Loop with Hinode/EIS
Active Region Moss: Doppler Shifts from Hinode/EIS Observations
Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores
Evidence of Impulsive Heating in Active Region Core Loops
Active Region Moss: Basic Physical Parameters and Their Temporal Variation
Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences
Temperature Tomography of a Coronal Sigmoid Supporting the Gradual Formation of a Flux Rope
Partially-erupting prominences: a comparison between observations and model-predicted observables
On active region loops: Hinode/EIS observations
Subject will be restored when possible
On the relationship between coronal waves associated with a CME on 5 March 2000
A bright coronal downflow seen in multi-wavelength observations: evidence of a bifurcating flux-rope?
EIT and TRACE responses to flare plasma
On the propagation of brightening after filament/prominence eruptions, as seen by SoHO-EIT
EUV and Coronagraphic Observations of Coronal Mass Ejetions
Observation of a bright coronal downflow by SOHO/EIT

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University