E-Print Archive

There are 3898 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Magnetic Structure and Dynamics of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2012 March 12  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2015-05-26 20:34

We present an investigation of the polar crown prominence that erupted on 2012 March 12. This prominence is observed at the southeast limb by SDO/AIA (end-on view) and displays a quasi vertical-thread structure. Bright U-shape/horn-like structure is observed surrounding the upper portion of the prominence at 171 angstrom before the eruption and becomes more prominent during the eruption. The disk view of STEREO-B shows that this long prominence is composed of a series of vertical threads and displays a half loop-like structure during the eruption. We focus on the magnetic support of the prominence vertical threads by studying the structure and dynamics of the prominence before and during the eruption using observations from SDO and STEREO-B. We also construct a series of magnetic field models (sheared arcade model, twisted flux rope model, and unstable model with hyperbolic flux tube (HFT)). Various observational characteristics appear to be in favor of the twisted flux rope model. We find that the flux rope supporting the prominence enters the regime of torus instability at the onset of the fast rise phase, and signatures of reconnection (post-eruption arcade, new U-shape structure, rising blobs) appear about one hour later. During the eruption, AIA observes dark ribbons seen in absorption at 171 angstrom corresponding to the bright ribbons shown at 304 angstrom, which might be caused by the erupting filament material falling back along the newly reconfigured magnetic fields. Brightenings at the inner edge of the erupting prominence arcade are also observed in all AIA EUV channels, which might be caused by the heating due to energy released from reconnection below the rising prominence.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Patrick I. McCauley, Haisheng Ji, Katharine K. Reeves, Edward E. DeLuca
Projects: SDO-AIA

Publication Status: 2015, ApJ, accepted
Last Modified: 2015-05-27 14:14
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Rotating Motion and Modeling of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2010 December 6  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2013-01-29 13:47

A large polar-crown prominence composed of different segments spanningnearly the entire solar disk erupted on 2010 December 6. Prior to theeruption, the filament in the active region part split into twolayers: a lower layer and an elevated layer. The eruption occurs inseveral episodes. Around 14:12 UT, the lower layer of the activeregion filament breaks apart: One part ejects toward the west, whilethe other part ejects toward the east, which leads to the explosiveeruption of the eastern quiescent filament. During the early risephase, part of the quiescent filament sheet displays strong rollingmotion (observed by STEREO-B) in the clockwise direction (viewed fromeast to west) around the filament axis. This rolling motion appears tostart from the border of the active region, then propagates toward theeast. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observes another type ofrotatingmotion: In some other parts of the erupting quiescentprominence, the vertical threads turn horizontal, then turn upsidedown. The elevated active region filament does not erupt until 18:00UT, when the erupting quiescent filament has already reached a verylarge height. We develop two simplified three-dimensional models thatqualitatively reproduce the observed rolling and rotating motions. Theprominence in the models is assumed to consist of a collection ofdiscrete blobs that are tied to particular field lines of a helicalflux rope. The observed rolling motion is reproduced by continuoustwist injection into the flux rope in Model 1 from the active regionside. Asymmetric reconnection induced by the asymmetric distributionof the magnetic fields on the two sides of the filament may cause theobserved rolling motion. The rotating motion of the prominence threadsobserved by AIA is consistent with the removal of the field line dipsin Model 2 from the top down during the eruption.

Authors: Yingna Su and Adriaan van Ballegooijen
Projects: SDO-AIA

Publication Status: 2013, ApJ, 764, 91
Last Modified: 2013-01-29 13:47
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Observations and Magnetic Field Modeling of a Solar Polar Crown Prominence  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2012-08-07 15:58

We present observations and magnetic field modeling of the large polar crown prominence that erupted on 2010 December 6. Combination of SDO/AIA and STEREO_Behind/EUVI allows us to see the fine structures of this prominence both at the limb and on the disk. We focus on the structures and dynamics of this prominence before the eruption. This prominence contains two parts: an active region part containing mainly horizontal threads, and a quiet Sun part containing mainly vertical threads. On the northern side of the prominence channel, both AIA and EUVI observe bright features which appear to be the lower legs of loops that go above then join in the filament. Filament materials are observed to frequently eject horizontally from the active region part to the quiet Sun part. This ejection results in the formation of a dense-column structure (concentration of dark vertical threads) near the border between the active region and the quiet Sun. Using the flux rope insertion method, we create non-linear force-free field models based on SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetograms. A key feature of these models is that the flux rope has connections with the surroundings photosphere, so its axial flux varies along the filament path. The height and location of the dips of field lines in our models roughly replicate those of the observed prominence. Comparison between model and observations suggests that the bright features on the northern side of the channel are the lower legs of the field lines that turn into the flux rope. We suggest that plasma may be injected into the prominence along these field lines. Although the models fit the observations quiet well, there are also some interesting differences. For example, the models do not reproduce the observed vertical threads and cannot explain the formation of the dense-column structure.

Authors: Yingna Su and Adriaan van Ballegooijen
Projects: SDO-AIA

Publication Status: 2012 ApJ, in press
Last Modified: 2012-08-08 12:14
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Observations and Mangetic Field Modeling of the Flare/CME event on 2010/04/08  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2011-04-06 08:56

We present a study of the flare/CME event that occurred in Active Region 11060 on 2010 April 8. This event also involves a filament eruption, EIT wave, and coronal dimming. Prior to the flare onset and filament eruption, both SDO/AIA and STEREO/EUVI observe a nearly horizontal filament ejection along the internal polarity inversion line, where flux cancellations frequently occur as observed by SDO/HMI. Using the flux-rope insertion method developed by van Ballegooijen (2004), we construct a grid of magnetic field models using two magneto-frictional relaxation methods. We find that the poloidal flux is significantly reduced during the relaxation process, though one relaxation method preserves the poloidal flux better than the other. The best-fit pre-flare NLFFF model is constrained by matching the coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT. We find that the axial flux in this model is very close to the threshold of instability. For the model that becomes unstable due to an increase of axial flux, the reconnected field lines below the X-point closely match the observed highly sheared flare loops at the event onset. The footpoints of the erupting flux rope are located around the coronal dimming regions. Both observational and modeling results support the premise that this event may be initiated by catastrophic loss-of-equilibrium caused by an increase of axial flux in the flux rope, which is driven by flux cancellations.

Authors: Su, Y. N., Surges, V., van Ballegooijen, A. A., Deluca, E., Golub, L.
Projects: SDO-AIA

Publication Status: 2011 Accepted by ApJ
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 10:48
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Structure and Dynamics of Quiescent Filament Channels Observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2010-08-06 08:03

We present a study on the structure and dynamics of quiescent filament channels observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI at the solar minimum 23/24 from December 2006 to December 2008. For 12 channels identified on the solar disk (Group I channels), we find that the morphology of the structure on the two sides of the channel is asymmetric in both X-rays and EUV: eastern side has curved features while the western side has straight features. We interpret the results in terms of a magnetic flux rope model. The asymmetry in the morphology is due to the variation in axial flux of the flux rope along the channel, which causes the field lines from one polarity to turn into the flux rope (curved feature), while the field lines from the other polarity are connected to very distant sources (straight). For most of the 68 channels identified by cavities at the east and west limbs (Group II channels), the asymmetry cannot be clearly identified, which is likely due to the fact that the axial flux may be relatively constant along such channels. Corresponding cavities are identified only for 5 of the 12 Group I channels, while Group II channels are identified for all of the 68 cavity pairs. The studied filament channels are often observed as dark channels in X-rays and EUV. Sheared loops within Group I channels are often seen in X-rays, but are rarely seen in Group II channels as shown in the XRT daily synoptic observations. A survey on the dynamics of studied filament channels shows that filament eruptions occur at an average rate of 1.4 filament eruptions per channel per solar rotation.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Leon Golub
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: 2010 ApJ, 721, 901
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 09:08
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Flare Energy Build-Up in a Decaying Active Region Near a Coronal Hole  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2009-08-25 10:01

A B1.7 two-ribbon flare occurred in a highly non-potential decaying active region near a coronal hole at 10:00 UT on May 17, 2008. This flare is "large" in the sense that it involves the entire region, and it is associated with both a filament eruption and a CME. We present multi-wavelength observations from EUV (TRACE, STEREO/EUVI), X-rays (Hinode/XRT), and Hα (THEMIS, BBSO) prior to, during and after the flare. Prior to the flare, the region contained two filaments. The long J-shaped sheared loops corresponding to the southern filament were evolved from two short loop systems, which happened around 22:00 UT after a filament eruption on May 16. Formation of highly sheared loops in the south eastern part of the region was observed by STEREO 8 hours before the flare. We also perform non-linear force free field (NLFFF) modeling for the region at two times prior to the flare, using the flux rope insertion method. The models include the non-force-free effect of magnetic buoyancy in the photosphere. The best-fit NLFFF models show good fit to observations both in the corona (X-ray and EUV loops) and chromosphere (Hα filament). We find that the horizontal fields in the photosphere are relatively insensitive to the present of flux ropes in the corona. The axial flux of the flux rope in the NLFFF model on May 17 is twice that on May 16, and the model on May 17 is only marginally stable. We also find that the quasi-circular flare ribbons are associated with the separatrix between open and closed fields. This observation and NLFFF modeling suggest that this flare may be triggered by the reconnection at the null point on the separatrix surface.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Brigitte Schmieder, Arkadiusz Berlicki, Yang Guo, Leon Golub, Guangli Huang
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: 2009, ApJ, v. 704, p. 341-353
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 09:05
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Observations and Nonlinear Force-Free Field Modeling of Active Region 10953  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2008-09-22 13:45

We present multi-wavelength observations of a simple bipolar active region (NOAA 10953), which produced several small flares (mostly B class and one C8.5 class) and filament activations from April 30 to May 3 in 2007. We also explore non-linear force free field (NLFFF) modeling of this region prior to the C8.5 flare on May 2, using magnetograph data from SOHO/MDI and Hinode/SOT. A series of NLFFF models are constructed using the flux-rope insertion method. By comparing the modeled field lines with multiple X-ray loops observed by Hinode/XRT, we find that the axial flux of the flux rope in the best-fit models is 7e20 Mx, while the poloidal flux has a wider range of (0.1-10)e10 Mx/cm. The axial flux in the best-fit model is well below the upper limit (~15e20 Mx) for stable force-free configurations, which is consistent with the fact that no successful full filament eruption occurred in this active region. From multi-wavelength observations of the C8.5 flare, we find that the X-ray brightenings (in both RHESSI and XRT) appeared about 20 minutes earlier than the EUV brightenings seen in TRACE 171 Å images and filament activations seen in MLSO Hα images. This is interpreted as an indication that the X-ray emission may be caused by direct coronal heating due to reconnection, and the energy transported down to the chromosphere may be too low to produce EUV brightenings. This flare started from nearly unsheared flare loop, unlike most two-ribbon flares which begin with highly sheared footpoint brightenings. By comparing with our NLFFF model, we find that the early flare loop is located above the flux rope which has a sharp boundary. We suggest that this flare started near the outer edge of the flux rope, not at the inner side or at the bottom as in the standard two-ribbon flare model.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Bruce W. Lites, Edward E. Deluca, Leon Golub, Paolo C. Grigis, Guangli Huang, and Haisheng Ji
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: Astrophysical Journal, 2009, 691, 105-114.
Last Modified: 2009-02-05 08:39
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2008-09-22 13:44

We present multi-wavelength observations of a simple bipolar active region (NOAA 10953), which produced several small flares (mostly B class and one C8.5 class) and filament activations from April 30 to May 3 in 2007. We also explore non-linear force free field (NLFFF) modeling of this region prior to the C8.5 flare on May 2, using magnetograph data from SOHO/MDI and Hinode/SOT. A series of NLFFF models are constructed using the flux-rope insertion method. By comparing the modeled field lines with multiple X-ray loops observed by Hinode/XRT, we find that the axial flux of the flux rope in the best-fit models is 7e20 Mx, while the poloidal flux has a wider range of (0.1-10)e10 Mx/cm. The axial flux in the best-fit model is well below the upper limit (~15e20 Mx) for stable force-free configurations, which is consistent with the fact that no successful full filament eruption occurred in this active region. From multi-wavelength observations of the C8.5 flare, we find that the X-ray brightenings (in both RHESSI and XRT) appeared about 20 minutes earlier than the EUV brightenings seen in TRACE 171 Å images and filament activations seen in MLSO Hα images. This is interpreted as an indication that the X-ray emission may be caused by direct coronal heating due to reconnection, and the energy transported down to the chromosphere may be too low to produce EUV brightenings. This flare started from nearly unsheared flare loop, unlike most two-ribbon flares which begin with highly sheared footpoint brightenings. By comparing with our NLFFF model, we find that the early flare loop is located above the flux rope which has a sharp boundary. We suggest that this flare started near the outer edge of the flux rope, not at the inner side or at the bottom as in the standard two-ribbon flare model.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan van Ballegooijen, Bruce W. Lites, Edward E. Deluca, Leon Golub, Paolo C. Grigis, Guangli Huang, and Haisheng Ji
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: Accepted by ApJ, 2008
Last Modified: 2008-09-22 13:44
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-08-17 09:39

We present multi-wavelength observations of the evolution of the sheared magnetic fields in NOAA Active Region 10930, where two X-class flares occurred on 2006 December 13 and December 14, respectively. Observations made with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode suggest that the gradual formation of the sheared magnetic fields in this active region is caused by the rotation and west-to-east motion of an emerging sunspot. In the pre-flare phase of the two flares, XRT shows several highly sheared X-ray loops in the core field region, corresponding to a filament seen in the TRACE EUV observations. XRT observations also show that part of the sheared core field erupted, and another part of the sheared core field stayed behind during the flares, which may explain why a large part of the filament is still seen by TRACE after the flare. About 2-3 hours after the peak of each flare, the core field becomes visible in XRT again, and shows a highly sheared inner and less sheared outer structure. We also find that the post-flare core field is clearly less sheared than the pre-flare core field, which is consistent with the idea that the energy released during the flares is stored in the highly sheared fields prior to the flare.

Authors: Yingna Su, Leon Golub, Adriaan Van Ballegooijen, Edward Deluca, Kathy Reeves, Taro Sakao, Ryohei Kano, Noriyuki Narukage, and Kiyoto Shibasaki
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted by PASJ, 2007h
Last Modified: 2008-03-13 11:44
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Subject will be restored when possible  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-08-17 09:39

We present multi-wavelength observations of the evolution of the sheared magnetic fields in NOAA Active Region 10930, where two X-class flares occurred on 2006 December 13 and December 14, respectively. Observations made with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode suggest that the gradual formation of the sheared magnetic fields in this active region is caused by the rotation and west-to-east motion of an emerging sunspot. In the pre-flare phase of the two flares, XRT shows several highly sheared X-ray loops in the core field region, corresponding to a filament seen in the TRACE EUV observations. XRT observations also show that part of the sheared core field erupted, and another part of the sheared core field stayed behind during the flares, which may explain why a large part of the filament is still seen by TRACE after the flare. About 2-3 hours after the peak of each flare, the core field becomes visible in XRT again, and shows a highly sheared inner and less sheared outer structure. We also find that the post-flare core field is clearly less sheared than the pre-flare core field, which is consistent with the idea that the energy released during the flares is stored in the highly sheared fields prior to the flare.

Authors: Yingna Su, Leon Golub, Adriaan Van Ballegooijen, Edward Deluca, Kathy Reeves, Taro Sakao, Ryohei Kano, Noriyuki Narukage, and Kiyoto Shibasaki
Projects:

Publication Status: Accepted by PASJ, 2007h
Last Modified: 2008-03-13 17:28
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Evolution of the Sheared Magnetic Fields of two X-class Flares Observed by Hinode/XRT  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-08-17 09:39

We present multi-wavelength observations of the evolution of the sheared magnetic fields in NOAA Active Region 10930, where two X-class flares occurred on 2006 December 13 and December 14, respectively. Observations made with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode suggest that the gradual formation of the sheared magnetic fields in this active region is caused by the rotation and west-to-east motion of an emerging sunspot. In the pre-flare phase of the two flares, XRT shows several highly sheared X-ray loops in the core field region, corresponding to a filament seen in the TRACE EUV observations. XRT observations also show that part of the sheared core field erupted, and another part of the sheared core field stayed behind during the flares, which may explain why a large part of the filament is still seen by TRACE after the flare. About 2-3 hours after the peak of each flare, the core field becomes visible in XRT again, and shows a highly sheared inner and less sheared outer structure. We also find that the post-flare core field is clearly less sheared than the pre-flare core field, which is consistent with the idea that the energy released during the flares is stored in the highly sheared fields prior to the flare.

Authors: Yingna Su, Leon Golub, Adriaan Van Ballegooijen, Edward Deluca, Kathy Reeves, Taro Sakao, Ryohei Kano, Noriyuki Narukage, and Kiyoto Shibasaki
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: 2007, PASJ, 59, 785
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 12:47
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

WHAT DETERMINES THE INTENSITY OF SOLAR FLARE/CME EVENTS?  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-05-08 16:42

We present a comprehensive statistical study addressing the question of what determines the intensity of a solar flare and associated coronal mass ejection (CME). For a sample of 18 two-ribbon flares associated with CMEs, we have examined the correlations between the GOES soft X-ray peak flare flux (PFF), the CME speed (VCME) obtained from SOHO LASCO observations, and six magnetic parameters of the flaring active region. These six parameters measured from both TRACE and SOHO MDI observations are: the average background magnetic field strength (B), the area of the region where B is counted (S), the magnetic flux of this region (Φ), the initial shear angle (θ1, measured at the flare onset), the final shear angle (θ2, measured at the time when the shear change stops), and the change of shear angle (θ12=θ1- θ2) of the footpoints, respectively. We have found no correlation between θ1 and the intensity of flare/CME events, while the other five parameters are either positively or negatively correlated with both log10(PFF) and VCME. Among these five parameters, Φ and θ12 show the most significant correlations with log10(PFF) and VCME. The fact that both log10(PFF) and VCME are highly correlated with θ12 rather than with θ1 indicates that the intensity of flare/CME events may depend on the released magnetic free energy rather than the total free energy stored prior to the flare. We have also found that a linear combination of a subset of these six parameters shows a much better correlation with the intensity of flare/CME events than each parameter itself, and the combination of log10Φ, θ1, and θ12 is the top-ranked combination.

Authors: Yingna Su, Adriaan Van Ballegooijen, James McCaughey, Edward Deluca, Katharine K. Reeves, Leon Golub
Projects: TRACE

Publication Status: 2007, ApJ, 665, 1448.
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 09:05
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

A Statistical Study of Shear Motion of the Footpoints in Two-ribbon Flares  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-01-19 18:07

We present a statistical investigation of shear motion of the ultraviolet (UV) or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) footpoints in two-ribbon flares, using the high spatial resolution data obtained in 1998-2005 by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). To do this study, we have selected 50 well-observed X-and M- class two-ribbon flares as our sample. All these 50 flares are classified into three types based on the motions of the footpoints with respect to the magnetic field (SOHO/MDI). The relation between our classification scheme and the traditional classification scheme (i.e., ''ejective'' and ''confined'' flares) is discussed. We have found that 86% (43 out of 50) of these flares show both strong-to-weak shear change of footpoints and ribbon separation (type I flares), and 14% of the flares show no measurable shear change of conjugate footpoints, including 2 flares with very small ribbon separation (type II flares) and 5 flares having no ribbon separation at all through the entire flare process (type III flares). Shear motion of footpoints is thus a common feature in two-ribbon flares. A detailed analysis of the type I flares shows: 1) for a subset of 20 flares, the initial and final shear angles of the footpoints are mainly in the range from 50? to 80? and 15? to 55?, respectively; 2) in 10 of the 14 flares having both measured shear angle and corresponding hard X-ray observations, the cessation of shear change is 0-2 minutes earlier than the end of the impulsive phase, which may suggest that the change from impulsive to gradual phase is related to magnetic shear change.

Authors: Yingna Su, Leon Golub, and Adriaan A. Van Ballegooijen
Projects: TRACE

Publication Status: ApJ, Vol. 655, 606-614, 2007
Last Modified: 2011-04-06 09:04
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Analysis of magnetic shear in an X17 solar flare on October 28, 2003  

Yingna Su   Submitted: 2007-01-11 10:44

An X17 class (GOES soft X-ray) two-ribbon solar flare on 2003 October 28 is analyzed in order to determine the relationship between the timing of the impulsive phase of the flare and the magnetic shear change in the flaring region. EUV observations made by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) show a clear decrease in the shear of the flare footpoints during the flare. The shear change stopped in the middle of the impulsive phase. The observations are interpreted in terms of the splitting of the sheared envelope field of the greatly sheared core rope during the early phase of the flare. We have also investigated the temporal correlation between the EUV emission from the brightenings observed by TRACE and the hard X-ray (HXR) emission (E > 150 keV) observed by the anticoincidence system (ACS) of the spectrometer SPI on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite. The correlation between these two emissions is very good, and the HXR sources (RHESSI) late in the flare are located within the two EUV ribbons. These observations are favorable to the explanation that the EUV brightenings mainly result from direct bombardment of the atmosphere by the energetic particles accelerated at the reconnection site, as does the HXR emission. However, if there is a high temperature (T > 20 MK) HXR source close to the loop top, a contribution of thermal conduction to the EUV brightenings cannot be ruled out.

Authors: Y.N. Su, L. Golub, A.A. Van Ballegooijen, M. Gros
Projects: TRACE

Publication Status: Solar Physics, 2006, Vol 236, 325-349
Last Modified: 2007-01-11 11:56
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Magnetic Structure and Dynamics of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2012 March 12
Rotating Motion and Modeling of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2010 December 6
Observations and Magnetic Field Modeling of a Solar Polar Crown Prominence
Observations and Mangetic Field Modeling of the Flare/CME event on 2010/04/08
Structure and Dynamics of Quiescent Filament Channels Observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI
Flare Energy Build-Up in a Decaying Active Region Near a Coronal Hole
Observations and Nonlinear Force-Free Field Modeling of Active Region 10953
Subject will be restored when possible
Subject will be restored when possible
Subject will be restored when possible
Evolution of the Sheared Magnetic Fields of two X-class Flares Observed by Hinode/XRT
WHAT DETERMINES THE INTENSITY OF SOLAR FLARE/CME EVENTS?
A Statistical Study of Shear Motion of the Footpoints in Two-ribbon Flares
Analysis of magnetic shear in an X17 solar flare on October 28, 2003

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University