E-Print Archive

There are 3784 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Impulsive acceleration of coronal mass ejections: II. Relation to SXR flares and filament eruptions  

Bianca Maria Bein   Submitted: 2012-06-13 05:40

Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1 and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 CMEs in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events which were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration, and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the SXR peak time (for 77% of the events). In ~60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than ?5 min, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

Authors: B. M. Bein, S. Berkebile-Stoiser, A. M. Veronig, M. Temmer, B. Vrsnak
Projects: GOES X-rays ,STEREO

Publication Status: ApJ (in press)
Last Modified: 2012-06-13 15:31
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Impulsive acceleration of coronal mass ejections: I. Statistics and CME source region characteristics  

Bianca Maria Bein   Submitted: 2011-08-05 05:49

We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and CORinstruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), from theirinitiation, through the impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For aset of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity and acceleration profilesand statistically analysed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration,peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peakvelocity, height at peak acceleration and size of the CME source region. TheCME peak accelerations derived range from 20 to 6800 m s^2 and are inverselycorrelated to the acceleration duration and to the height at peak acceleration.74% of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 Rsun. CMEswhich originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive andreach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can beexplained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations anddecreases with height and CME size.

Authors: B. M. Bein, S. Berkebile-Stoiser, A. M. Veronig, M. Temmer, N. Muhr, I. Kienreich, D. Utz
Projects: STEREO

Publication Status: ApJ (in press)
Last Modified: 2011-08-05 08:32
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Impulsive acceleration of coronal mass ejections: II. Relation to SXR flares and filament eruptions
Impulsive acceleration of coronal mass ejections: I. Statistics and CME source region characteristics

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University