E-Print Archive

There are 3783 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Heliophysics gleaned from seismology  

Douglas Gough   Submitted: 2012-10-03 07:57

Some of the principal heliophysical inferences that have been drawn from, or refined by, seismology, and the manner in which those inferences have been made, are very briefly described. Prominence is given to the use of simple formulae, derived either from simple toy models or from asymptotic approximations to more realistic situations, for tailoring procedures to be used for analysing observations in such a way as to answer specific questions about physics. It is emphasized that precision is not accuracy, and that confusing the two can be quite misleading.

Authors: D. O. Gough
Projects:

Publication Status: in Progress in solar/stellar Physics with Helio- and Asteroseismology; Proc. 65th Fujihara Seminar, (ed. H. Shibahashi & M. Takata), Astron. Soc. Pacific Conf. Ser., vol. 462, pp 429--454 (2011)
Last Modified: 2012-10-11 10:49
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

On the magnetic field required for driving the observed angular-velocity variations in the solar convection zone  

Douglas Gough   Submitted: 2012-10-03 07:47

A putative temporally varying circulation-free magnetic-field configuration is inferred in an equatorial segment of the solar convection zone from the helioseismologically inferred angular-velocity variation, assuming that the predominant dynamics is angular acceleration produced by the azimuthal Maxwell stress exerted by a field whose surface values are consistent with photospheric line-of-sight measurements.

Authors: H.M. Antia, S.M. Chitre, D.O.Gough
Projects: None

Publication Status: to appear in MNRAS
Last Modified: 2012-10-03 11:24
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

What have we learned from helioseismology, what have we really learned, and what do we aspire to learn?  

Douglas Gough   Submitted: 2012-10-02 10:41

Helioseismology has been widely acclaimed as having been a great success: it appears to have answered nearly all the questions that we originally asked, some with unexpectedly high precision. We have learned how the sound speed and matter density vary throughout almost all of the solar interior - which not so very long ago was generally considered to be impossible - we have learned how the Sun rotates, and we have a beautiful picture, on a coffee cup, of the thermal stratification of a sunspot, and also an indication of the material flow around it. We have tried, with some success at times, to apply our findings to issues of broader relevance: the test of the General Theory of Relativity via planetary orbit precession (now almost forgotten because the issue has convincingly been closed, albeit no doubt temporarily), the solar neutrino problem, the manner of the transport of energy from the centre to the surface of the Sun, the mechanisms of angular-momentum redistribution, and the workings of the solar dynamo. The first two were of general interest to the broad scientific community beyond astronomy, and were, quite rightly, principally responsible for our acclaimed success; the others are still in a state of flux.

Authors: Douglas Gough
Projects: None

Publication Status: to appear in Solar Physics
Last Modified: 2012-10-02 10:51
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Heliophysics gleaned from seismology
On the magnetic field required for driving the observed angular-velocity variations in the solar convection zone
What have we learned from helioseismology, what have we really learned, and what do we aspire to learn?

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University