E-Print Archive

There are 3783 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Magnetic Flux Rope Shredding by a Hyperbolic Flux Tube: The Detrimental Effects of Magnetic Topology on Solar Eruptions  

Georgios Chintzoglou   Submitted: 2017-07-11 12:59

We present the analysis of an unusual failed eruption captured in high cadence and in many wavelengths during the observing campaign in support of the VAULT2.0 sounding rocket launch. The refurbished Very high Angular resolution Ultraviolet Telescope (VAULT2.0) is a Lyα (λ 1216 Å) spectroheliograph launched on September 30, 2014. The campaign targeted active region NOAA AR 12172 and was closely coordinated with the Hinode and IRIS missions and several ground-based observatories (NSO/IBIS, SOLIS, and BBSO). A filament eruption accompanied by a low level flaring event (at the GOES C-class level) occurred around the VAULT2.0 launch. No Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) was observed. The eruption and its source region, however, were recorded by the campaign instruments in many atmospheric heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona in high cadence and spatial resolution. This is a rare occasion which enables us to perform a comprehensive investigation on a failed eruption. We find that a rising Magnetic Flux Rope-like (MFR) structure was destroyed during its interaction with the ambient magnetic field creating downflows of cool plasma and diffuse hot coronal structures reminiscent of "cusps". We employ magnetofrictional simulations to show that the magnetic topology of the ambient field is responsible for the destruction of the MFR. Our unique observations suggest that the magnetic topology of the corona is a key ingredient for a successful eruption.

Authors: Georgios Chintzoglou, Angelos Vourlidas, Antonia Savcheva, Svetlin Tassev, Samuel Tun Beltran, Guillermo Stenborg
Projects: GOES X-rays,Hinode/SOT,IRIS,SDO-AIA,SDO-HMI,SoHO-LASCO,Very high-Angular resolution Ultraviolet Telescope 2.0 (VAULT2)

Publication Status: Published in the Astrophysical Journal, Vol 843, p. 93
Last Modified: 2017-07-12 11:41
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during Confined Flaring Well Before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections  

Georgios Chintzoglou   Submitted: 2015-07-06 18:46

NOAA Active Region (AR) 11429 was the source of twin super-fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The CMEs took place within a hour from each other, with the onset of the first taking place in the beginning of March 7, 2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for a ``super active region''; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a δ-spot magnetic configuration. One of the biggest storms of Solar Cycle 24 to date (Dst=-143 nT) was associated with one of these events. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in ~10 MK hot plasma emission and are often considered the core of erupting structures. However, their ``dormant'' existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is an open question. Aided by multi-wavelength observations (SDO/HMI/AIA and STEREO EUVI B) and a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work uncovers two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of pre-eruption MFRs that eventually became the seeds of the two CMEs. The MFRs could have been formed during confined (i.e. not leading to major CMEs) flaring and sub-flaring events which took place the day before the two CMEs in the host AR 11429.

Authors: Georgios Chintzoglou, Spiros Patsourakos, Angelos Vourlidas
Projects: None

Publication Status: In print; Astrophysical Journal (ApJ)
Last Modified: 2015-07-08 12:56
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Reconstructing the Subsurface Three-Dimensional Magnetic Structure of A Solar Active Region Using SDO/HMI Observations  

Georgios Chintzoglou   Submitted: 2013-01-21 19:39

A solar active region (AR) is a three-dimensional magnetic structure formed in the convection zone, whose property is fundamentally important for determining the coronal structure and solar activity when emerged. However, our knowledge on the detailed 3-D structure prior to its emergence is rather poor, largely limited by the low cadence and sensitivity of previous instruments. Here, using the 45-second high-cadence observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (emph{HMI}) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (emph{SDO}), we are able for the first time to reconstruct a 3-D datacube and infer the detailed subsurface magnetic structure of NOAA AR 11158 and to characterize its magnetic connectivity and topology. This task is accomplished with the aid of the image-stacking method and advanced 3-D visualization. We find that the AR consists of two major bipoles, or four major polarities. Each polarity in 3-D shows interesting tree-like structure, i.e. while the root of the polarity appears as a single tree-trunk-like tube, the top of the polarity has multiple branches consisting of smaller and thinner flux-tubes which connect to the branches of the opposite polarity that is similarly fragmented. The roots of the four polarities align well along a straight line, while the top branches are slightly non-coplanar. Our observations suggest that an active region, even appearing highly complicated on the surface, may originate from a simple straight flux-tube that undergoes both horizontal and vertical bifurcation processes during its rise through the convection zone.

Authors: Chintzoglou Georgios, Zhang Jie
Projects: SDO-HMI

Publication Status: ApJL (in press)
Last Modified: 2013-01-22 10:40
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Magnetic Flux Rope Shredding by a Hyperbolic Flux Tube: The Detrimental Effects of Magnetic Topology on Solar Eruptions
Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during Confined Flaring Well Before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections
Reconstructing the Subsurface Three-Dimensional Magnetic Structure of A Solar Active Region Using SDO/HMI Observations

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University