E-Print Archive

There are 3950 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare  

Noriyuki Narukage   Submitted: 2014-04-16 03:16

Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amount of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point); with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ~0.017.

Authors: Noriyuki Narukage, Masumi Shimojo and Taro Sakao
Projects: Nobeyama Radioheliograph,Yohkoh-SXT

Publication Status: Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Last Modified: 2014-04-16 13:12
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Coronal-Temperature-Diagnostic Capability of the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope Based on Self-Consistent Calibration. II. Calibration with on-Orbit Data  

Noriyuki Narukage   Submitted: 2013-07-18 01:13

The X-Ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode satellite is an X-ray imager that observes the solar corona with the capability of diagnosing coronal temperatures from less than 1 MK to more than 10 MK. To make full use of this capability, Narukage et al. (Solar Phys. 269, 169, 2011) determined the thickness of each of the X-ray focal-plane analysis filters based on calibration measurements from the ground-based end-to-end test. However, in their paper, the calibration of the thicker filters for observations of active regions and flares, namely the med-Be, med-Al, thick-Al and thick-Be filters, was insufficient due to the insufficient X-ray flux used in the measurements. In this work, we recalibrate those thicker filters using quiescent active region data taken with multiple filters of XRT. On the basis of our updated calibration results, we present the revised coronal-temperature-diagnostic capability of XRT.

Authors: Noriyuki Narukage, Taro Sakao, Ryouhei Kano, Masumi Shimojo, Amy Winebarger, Mark Weber, Kathy K Reeves
Projects: Hinode/XRT

Publication Status: accepted for publication in Solar Physics
Last Modified: 2013-07-18 18:47
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare
Coronal-Temperature-Diagnostic Capability of the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope Based on Self-Consistent Calibration. II. Calibration with on-Orbit Data

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University