E-Print Archive

There are 4291 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
* News 04/04/20 * The archive is using a new backend database. This has thrown up a few SQL errors in the last few days. If you have any issues please email adavey@nso.edu with either the number of eprint you are trying to edit or a link to your preprint.

Hi-C 2.1 Observations of Jetlet-like Events at Edges of Solar Magnetic Network Lanes  

Navdeep Panesar   Submitted: 2019-12-25 10:42

We present high-resolution, high-cadence observations of six, fine-scale, on-disk jet-like events observed by the High-resolution Coronal Imager 2.1 (Hi-C 2.1) during its sounding-rocket flight. We combine the Hi-C 2.1 images with images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), and investigate each event?s magnetic setting with co-aligned line-of-sight magnetograms from the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). We find that (i) all six events are jetlet-like (having apparent properties of jetlets), (ii) all six are rooted at edges of magnetic network lanes, (iii) four of the jetlet-like events stem from sites of flux cancelation between majority-polarity network flux and merging minority-polarity flux, and (iv) four of the jetlet-like events show brightenings at their bases reminiscent of the base brightenings in coronal jets. The average spire length of the six jetlet-like events (9000 ? 3000 km) is three times shorter than that for IRIS jetlets (27,000 ? 8000 km). While not ruling out other generation mechanisms, the observations suggest that at least four of these events may be miniature versions of both larger-scale coronal jets that are driven by minifilament eruptions and still-larger-scale solar eruptions that are driven by filament eruptions. Therefore, we propose that our Hi-C events are driven by the eruption of a tiny sheared-field flux rope, and that the flux rope field is built and triggered to erupt by flux cancelation.

Authors: Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Savage, Sabrina L.; Golub, Leon E.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Kobayashi, Ken; Brooks, David H.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; McKenzie, David E.; Morton, Richard J.; Peter, Hardi; Testa, Paola; Walsh, Robert W.; Warren, Harry P.
Projects: None

Publication Status: Published in ApJ Letters
Last Modified: 2019-12-26 19:40
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

IRIS and SDO Observations of Solar Jetlets Resulting from Network-edge Flux Cancelation  

Navdeep Panesar   Submitted: 2018-11-28 12:29

Recent observations show that the buildup and triggering of minifilament eruptions that drive coronal jets result from magnetic flux cancelation at the neutral line between merging majority- and minority-polarity magnetic flux patches. We investigate the magnetic setting of 10 on-disk small-scale UV/EUV jets (jetlets, smaller than coronal X-ray jets but larger than chromospheric spicules) in a coronal hole by using IRIS UV images and SDO/AIA EUV images and line-of-sight magnetograms from SDO/HMI. We observe recurring jetlets at the edges of magnetic network flux lanes in the coronal hole. From magnetograms coaligned with the IRIS and AIA images, we find, clearly visible in nine cases, that the jetlets stem from sites of flux cancelation proceeding at an average rate of ~1.5 X1018 Mx hr-1, and show brightenings at their bases reminiscent of the base brightenings in larger-scale coronal jets. We find that jetlets happen at many locations along the edges of network lanes (not limited to the base of plumes) with average lifetimes of 3 minutes and speeds of 70 km s-1. The average jetlet-base width (4000 km) is three to four times smaller than for coronal jets (~18,000 km). Based on these observations of 10 obvious jetlets, and our previous observations of larger-scale coronal jets in quiet regions and coronal holes, we infer that flux cancelation is an essential process in the buildup and triggering of jetlets. Our observations suggest that network jetlet eruptions might be small-scale analogs of both larger-scale coronal jets and the still-larger-scale eruptions producing CMEs.

Authors: Navdeep K. Panesar, Alphonse C. Sterling, Ronald L. Moore, Sanjiv K. Tiwari, Bart De Pontieu, and Aimee A. Norton
Projects: IRIS

Publication Status: Published in ApJ Letters
Last Modified: 2018-12-03 09:55
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Origin of Solar Quiet Region Pre-Jet Minifilaments  

Navdeep Panesar   Submitted: 2017-07-05 17:01

We investigate the origin of ten solar quiet region pre-jet minifilaments, using EUV images from SDO/AIA and magnetograms from SDO/HMI. We recently found (Panesar et al. 2016b) that quiet region coronal jets are driven by minifilament eruptions, where those eruptions result from flux cancelation at the magnetic neutral line under the minifilament. Here, we study the longer-term origin of the pre-jet minifilaments themselves. We find that they result from flux cancelation between minority-polarity and majority-polarity flux patches. In each of ten pre-jet regions, we find that opposite-polarity patches of magnetic flux converge and cancel, with a flux reduction of 10-40% from before to after the minifilament appears. For our ten events, the minifilaments exist for periods ranging from 1.5 hr to two days before erupting to make a jet. Apparently, the flux cancelation builds highly sheared field that runs above and traces the neutral line, and the cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament forms in this field and is suspended in it. We infer that the convergence of the opposite-polarity patches results in reconnection in the low corona that builds a magnetic arcade enveloping the minifilament in its core, and that the continuing flux cancelation at the neutral line finally destabilizes the minifilament field so that it erupts and drives the production of a coronal jet. Thus our observations strongly support that quiet region magnetic flux cancelation results in both the formation of the pre-jet minifilament and its jet-driving eruption.

Authors: Navdeep K. Panesar, Alphonse C. Sterling, Ronald L. Moore
Projects: SDO-AIA

Publication Status: accepted for publication in ApJ
Last Modified: 2017-07-06 10:44
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets  

Navdeep Panesar   Submitted: 2016-11-21 13:17

We report observations of 10 random on-disk solar quiet-region coronal jets found in high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and having good coverage in magnetograms from the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (called a minifilament). However, the trigger of these eruptions is still unknown. In the present study, we address the question: what leads to the jet-driving minifilament eruptions? The EUV observations show that there is a cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament present prior to each jet event and the minifilament eruption drives the jet. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in the line of sight photospheric magnetic field, we observe that each pre-jet minifilament resides over the neutral line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity patches of magnetic flux. In each of the 10 cases, the opposite-polarity patches approach and merge with each other (flux reduction between 21% and 57%). After several hours, continuous flux cancelation at the neutral line apparently destabilizes the field holding the cool-plasma minifilament to erupt and undergo internal reconnection, and external reconnection with the surrounding coronal field. The external reconnection opens the minifilament field allowing the minifilament material to escape outward, forming part of the jet spire. Thus, we found that each of the 10 jets resulted from eruption of a minifilament following flux cancelation at the neutral line under the minifilament. These observations establish that magnetic flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

Authors: Navdeep K. Panesar, Alphonse C. Sterling, Ronald L. Moore, Prithi Chakrapani
Projects: SDO-AIA,SDO-HMI

Publication Status: Published in ApJ Letters
Last Modified: 2016-11-23 15:16
Go to main E-Print page  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 


Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Abstracts by Author
Hi-C 2.1 Observations of Jetlet-like Events at Edges of Solar Magnetic Network Lanes
IRIS and SDO Observations of Solar Jetlets Resulting from Network-edge Flux Cancelation
Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Origin of Solar Quiet Region Pre-Jet Minifilaments
Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2000-2020 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University