E-Print Archive

There are 3928 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
Type III Solar Radio Burst Source Region Splitting Due to a Quasi-Separatrix Layer View all abstracts by submitter

Patrick McCauley   Submitted: 2017-11-14 21:21

We present low-frequency (80-240 MHz) radio imaging of type III solar radio bursts observed by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) on 2015/09/21. The source region for each burst splits from one dominant component at higher frequencies into two increasingly-separated components at lower frequencies. For channels below ~132 MHz, the two components repetitively diverge at high speeds (0.1-0.4 c) along directions tangent to the limb, with each episode lasting just ~2 s. We argue that both effects result from the strong magnetic field connectivity gradient that the burst-driving electron beams move into. Persistence mapping of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) jets observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveals quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) associated with coronal null points, including separatrix dome, spine, and curtain structures. Electrons are accelerated at the flare site toward an open QSL, where the beams follow diverging field lines to produce the source splitting, with larger separations at larger heights (lower frequencies). The splitting motion within individual frequency bands is interpreted as a projected time-of-flight effect, whereby electrons traveling along the outer field lines take slightly longer to excite emission at adjacent positions. Given this interpretation, we estimate an average beam speed of 0.2 c. We also qualitatively describe the quiescent corona, noting in particular that a disk-center coronal hole transitions from being dark at higher frequencies to bright at lower frequencies, turning over around 120 MHz. These observations are compared to synthetic images based on the Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithm outside a Sphere (MAS) model, which we use to flux-calibrate the burst data.

Authors: Patrick I. McCauley, Iver H. Cairns, John Morgan, Sarah E. Gibson, James C. Harding, Colin Lonsdale, and Divya Oberoi
Projects: None

Publication Status: Accepted by ApJ
Last Modified: 2017-11-15 12:19
Go to main E-Print page  On a small-scale EUV wave: the driving mechanism and the associated oscillating filament  On a solar blowout jet: driven mechanism and the formation of cool and hot components  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Delete Entry 

Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Previous AbstractPrevious Abstract.
Next AbstractNext Abstract.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
View All Abstracts By SubmitterView all abstracts by submitter.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Latest Entries
Diagnostic Analysis of the Solar Proton Flares of September 2017 by Their Radio Bursts
Densities Probed by Coronal Type III Radio Burst Imaging
The Minimum Energy Principle Applied to Parker's Coronal Braiding and Nanoflaring Scenario
Eruptions from quiet Sun coronal bright points. I. Observations
Evolution of the transverse density structure of oscillating coronal loops inferred by forward modelling of EUV intensity
Non-stationary quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares
Lost and found sunquake in the 6 September 2011 flare caused by beam electrons
Nonkinematic solar dynamo models with double-cell meridional circulation
Solar Kinetic Energy and Cross Helicity Spectra
Collective Study of Polar Crown Filaments in the Past Four Solar Cycles
Highly Ionized Calcium and Argon X-ray Spectra from a Large Solar Flare
Detecting the solar new magnetic flux regions on the base of vector magnetograms
A Truly Global EUV Wave From the SOL2017-09-10 X8.2 Solar Flare-CME Eruption
ALTERNATIVE ZEBRA-STRUCTURE MODELS IN SOLAR RADIO EMISSION
Photospheric Shear Flows in Solar Active Regions and Their Relation to Flare Occurrence
Linear Polarization Features in the Quiet-Sun Photosphere: Structure and Dynamics
Solar Microflares Observed by SphinX and RHESSI
Two Kinds of Dynamic Behavior in a Quiescent Prominence Observed by the NVST
Resistively-limited current sheet implosions in planar anti-parallel (1D) and null-point containing (2D) magnetic field geometries
Is It Small-scale Weak Magnetic Activity That Effectively Heats the Upper Solar Atmosphere?

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University