E-Print Archive

There are 3882 abstracts currently viewable.


Search:

Advanced Search
Options
Main Page Add New E-Print Submitter
Information
Feedback
News Help/FAQ About Preferences
Manage Key Phrase
Notification
On-Orbit Performance of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory View all abstracts by submitter

J Todd Hoeksema   Submitted: 2018-02-06 12:43

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument is a major component of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. Since beginning normal science operations on May 2010, HMI has operated with remarkable continuity, e.g. during the more than five years of the SDO prime mission that ended 30 September 2015, HMI collected 98.4% of all possible 45-second velocity maps; minimizing gaps in these full-disk Dopplergrams is crucial for helioseismology. HMI velocity, intensity, and magnetic-field measurements are used in numerous investigations, so understanding the quality of the data is important. We describe the calibration measurements used to track HMI performance and detail trends in important instrument parameters during the mission. Regular calibration sequences provide information used to improve and update the HMI data calibration. The set-point temperature of the instrument front window and optical bench is adjusted regularly to maintain instrument focus, and changes in the temperature-control scheme have been made to improve stability in the observable quantities. The exposure time has been changed to compensate for a 15% decrease in instrument throughput. Measurements of the performance of the shutter and tuning mechanisms show that they are aging as expected and continue to perform according to specification. Parameters of the tunable-optical-filter elements are regularly adjusted to account for drifts in the central wavelength. Frequent measurements of changing CCD-camera characteristics, such as gain and flat field, are used to calibrate the observations. Infrequent expected events, such as eclipses, transits, and spacecraft off-points, interrupt regular instrument operations and provide the opportunity to perform additional calibration. Onboard instrument anomalies are rare and seem to occur quite uniformly in time. The instrument continues to perform very well.

Authors: J.T. Hoeksema, C.S. Baldner, R.I. Bush, J. Schou, P.H. Scherrer
Projects: SDO-HMI

Publication Status: Accepted in Solar Physics
Last Modified: 2018-02-08 16:20
Go to main E-Print page  Flux Rope Breaking and Formation of a Rotating Blowout Jet  Two-Phase Heating in Flaring Loops  Edit Entry  Download Preprint  Submitter's Homepage Delete Entry 

Key
Go to main E-Print pageGo to main E-Print page.
Previous AbstractPrevious Abstract.
Next AbstractNext Abstract.
Download PreprintDownload Preprint.
Submitter's HomepageSubmitters Homepage.
Edit EntryEdit Entry.
View All Abstracts By SubmitterView all abstracts by submitter.
Delete AbstractDelete abstract.

Latest Entries
The origin of the modulation of the radio emission from the solar corona by a fast magnetoacoustic wave
Indirect solar wind measurements using archival cometary tail observations
Helium abundance and speed difference between helium ions and protons in the solar wind from coronal holes, active regions, and quiet Sun
Always a Farm Boy
Effect of transport coefficients on excitation of flare-induced standing slow-mode waves in coronal loops
Study of Three-dimensional Magnetic Structure and the Successive Eruptive Nature of Active Region 12371
Statistical study of magnetic non-potential measures in confined and eruptive flares
Quasi-periodic Counter-propagating Fast Magnetosonic Wave Trains from Neighboring Flares: SDO/AIA Observations and 3D MHD Modeling
Negative flare in the He I 10830 Å line in facula
Time resolved spectroscopic observations of an M-dwarf flare star EV Lac during a flare
Two Episodes of Magnetic Reconnections During a Confined Circular-ribbon Flare
Enhanced stellar activity for slow antisolar differential rotation?
Quasi-periodic pulsations in the most powerful solar flare of Cycle 24
GONG Catalog of Solar Filament Oscillations Near Solar Maximum
Chromospheric response during the precursor and the main phase of a B6.4 flare on August 20, 2005
Unambiguous Evidence of Coronal Implosions During Solar Eruptions and Flares
Two Types of Long-duration Quasi-static Evolution of Solar Filaments
Oscillations of cometary tails: a vortex shedding phenomenon?
Observations of Running Penumbral Waves Emerging in a Sunspot
Reconnection in the Post-Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares

Related Pages
MSU Solar Physics.
Max Millennium Science Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Message of the Day Mail Archive.
Max Millennium Flare Catalog

Archive Maintainer
Alisdair Davey



© 2003 Solar Physics Group - Montana State University