[picture]

PETRUS (PIET) C MARTENS

Research Professor in Physics
Affiliate Professor in Computer Science
Research Associate, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Office: EPS 247
Telephone: (406)994-4470
Fax: (406)994-4452
martens@physics.montana.edu

Petrus C. Martens
Physics Department
Montana State University
PO BOX 173840
Bozeman, MT 59717-3840

Solar Physics

Education

B.S., Astronomy, 1977, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
M.S., Theoretical Astrophysics, 1979, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Ph.D., Theoretical Astrophysics (Cum Laude), 1983, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Special Studies in Management and Administration, Harvard University Extension School (1988-1990)

Recent Appointments

Co-chair, SCOSTEP VarSITI Science Focus Group on Solar Evolution & Extreme Events (SEE), 2014-2018
Member, Advanced Technology Solar Telescope Science Working Group, 2014-2017
Associate Editor, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2003-2012
Winner of the 2011 MSU College of Letters and Science Award for Meritorious Research and Creativity
Chair, NASA Living with a Star Focus Group on "Solar Modulation of the Galactic Cosmic Rays and the Production
of Cosmogenic Isotope Archives of Long-term Solar Activity, Used to Interpret Past Climate Changes,"
2008-2012
Member, NASA Living with a Star Management Operations Working Group, 2009-2010
Member, Solar and Heliospheric NASA Heliophysics Management Operations Working Group, 2008-2009

Publications: Links to Preprints, Reprints, and the ADS Database

Presentations: A List of Seminars and Conference Papers, 1999 - present

Recent News Items: Press Conferences, Articles, Interviews

Joint Publications with Students and Postdocs

Research Projects

Teaching

Student Research

Space Exploration: Solar Physics Missions

Image Gallery: The Beauty of Solar Physics

Observations of Solar magnetic structures are the only and indispensable link between Magneto-Hydrodynamics (MHD) in a controlled laboratory setting, such as in Tokamaks and stellarators, and the MHD of exotic and fascinating, but irreproducable and mostly unresolvable magnetic objects in the Universe , such as neutron star pulsars, magnetic stars, and quasars.

Thus the Sun is a unique astrophysical laboratory for magnetic fields. The instruments that Solar physicists have built to study Solar magnetic fields routinely produce stunning imagery. A personal selection, result of the work of a high school summer student some time ago, and pertinent to the research interests of our Solar group, is shown here.

Back to Physics Homepage Back to Faculty Directory To Solar Physics Research Page

Please contact me for comments, questions, and contributions.
Member, Solar and Heliospheric NASA Heliophysics Management Operations Working Group, 2008-2009
Member, NASA Living with a Star Management Operations Working Group, 2009-2010
Chair, NASA Living with a Star Focus Group on "Solar Modulation of the Galactic Cosmic Rays and the Production
of Cosmogenic Isotope Archives of Long-term Solar Activity, Used to Interpret Past Climate Changes."
2008-2012.