HARLOW SHAPLEY VISITING LECTURE IN ASTRONOMY
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 7:30 PM
HAGER AUDITORIUM, MUSEUM OF THE ROCKIES

OUR RESTLESS, MAGNETIC SUN
Prof. John H. Thomas
University of Rochester

What gives with the sun?  How does it work?  Why does it behave the
way it does?  What effect does it have on us on the Earth?  The
Museum of the Rockies with be hosting a man with some answers on
Friday, October 31, when Dr. John H. Thomas delivers the Harlow
Shapley Visiting Lecture in Astronomy in the museum's Hager
Auditorium beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Dr. Thomas is Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Sciences and
Astronomy at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York,
specializing in theoretical astrophysics and plasma physics.  His
research involves studying how the sun's complex magnetic field and
fluid dynamics regulate the sun's behavior, and his talk, entitled
"Our Restless, Magnetic Sun" will focus on recent advances in
understanding the sun's magnetic field and cycle, sunspots, and how
they affect the Earth.

This free public talk is sponsored by the Harlow Shapley Visiting
Lectureships in Astronomy program of the American Astronomical
Society (AAS) and the Montana State University EPSCoR program.

Immediately following the talk at about 8:30 p.m, the Southwest
Montana Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at the
museum, followed by public telescope observing of the planet Mars and
other celestial objects on the museum's entrance plaza, weather
permitting.

Harlow Shapley, for whom the visiting lectureship program is named,
was a well-known twentieth-century astronomer whose work on the
colors and magnitudes of stars led to accurate distance estimates for
globular star clusters and revealed that our sun was not centrally
located in the Milky Way Galaxy, but was located near its outer rim.
He later discovered several dwarf galaxies located in the Local Group
of galaxies that includes the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy.

Shapley served a term as president of the American Astronomical
Society. He was a popular lecturer and educator, and helped the
Society to inaugurate its Visiting Professors Program that allows
astronomy researchers to share their work with colleagues and the
general public.

For more information, contact Dr. Richard Canfield of the Montana
State University Physics Department at 994-5581.


#######


*********************************************************
*   James G. Manning - Director      |    /\   MOR  |   *
*   Taylor Planetarium               |   /  \ /\    |   *
*   Museum of the Rockies            |  /    /  /\  |   *
*   Bozeman, MT 59717                | /    /  /  \ |   *
*   manning@montana.edu              |/____/__/____\|   *
*********************************************************